Wings of The Great War, a limited-edition series of 1/72 scale models, commemorates the
pilots and planes on the 100th Anniversary of World War I.

Each handsome and historically accurate model is crafted and painted by hand. Plus, the exclusive stand features an articulating mount that allows you to seamlessly pivot the model in virtually any direction or angle to create a custom scene.

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1:72 SCALE MODELS NOW AVAILABLE
Airco D.H.4
#WW11101

1/72 Display Model, USMC, Squadron D, France 1918.

Though it was designed by legendary British aviation engineer Geoffrey de Havilland, the Airco DH.4 was a bomber primarily manufactured in the United States for American forces during World War I. Of the 6,295 built, 4,846 were produced in the U.S. Its first flight occurred in August of 1916, and it was officially introduced in March of 1917. It was not retired until 1932.

This 1/72 scale resin display model replica of a DH.4 operating with the USMC's Squadron D - one of only eight Marine aerial squadrons during the war, as it appeared in 1918 France - features finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, a detailed piston engine and rotating propeller, fixed landing gear, authentic markings, and articulated display stand. Measures approximately 5" long with a 7¼" wingspan.

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Albatros D.Va
#WW14002

1/72 Display Model, Lt. Kurt Monnington, Jasta 15, 1917

The Albatros D.V was a fighter aircraft introduced late in the war, in 1917, and was the final installment in the "D.I" family. Despite well-known structural shortcomings, the D.V saw over 2,500 total units manufactured, with 1,600 of these being the heavier D.Va variant. Though it neared obsolescence by the end of the war, it was flown in relatively large numbers through the Armistice, when production permanently ceased.

This 1/72 scale resin display model of an Albatros D.Va flown by Lt. Kurt Monnington - a German fighter pilot with eight confirmed victories and both a First Class Iron Cross and Second Class Iron Cross winner - has the attention to detail that collectors love, such as the fabric-covered wings with visible ribs to the intricate 180-hp Mercedes D.IIIaü engine, wing and landing gear bracing, magnificently re-created paint scheme on the wings, authentic markings, and an articulated display stand. Measures approximately 4" long with a 5" wingspan.

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Albatros D.Va
#WW14003

1/72 Display Model, Lt. Max Muller, Jasta 28, Late 1917

The Albatros D.V was a fighter aircraft introduced late in the war, in 1917, and was the final installment in the "D.I" family. Despite well-known structural shortcomings, the D.V saw over 2,500 total units manufactured, with 1,600 of these being the heavier D.Va variant. Though it neared obsolescence by the end of the war, it was flown in relatively large numbers through the Armistice, when production permanently ceased.

This 1/72 scale resin display model — a replica of an Albatros D.Va flown by 36-victory ace Max Muller, the highest scoring Bavarian pilot of the war, as it appeared with Jasta 28 in late 1917 — features fabric-covered wings with visible ribs to the intricate 180-hp Mercedes D.IIIaü engine, a pilot figure, wing and landing gear bracing, a magnificently recreated paint scheme, authentic markings, and articulated display stand. Measures approximately 4" long with a 5" wingspan. 

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Fokker Dr.I
#WW12001

1/72 Display Model, JG I "The Flying Circus", Manfred von Richthofen, 1918

First flying in 1917, the Fokker Dr.I was an exceptionally maneuverable triplane fighter that saw widespread service with the Luftstreitkräfte in the spring of 1918.

This limited edition, newly tooled, 1/72 scale, resin display model of the famous Fokker Dr.I flown by 80-victory ace Manfred von Richthofen, better remembered as the "Red Baron," of JG 1, "The Flying Circus," has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the finely textured surfaces that simulated fabric-on-frame construction to the wing struts and supports, fuselage-mounted Spandau lMG 08 machine guns, the Baron's familiar red paint scheme, authentic markings, and an articulated display stand. 4" wingspan.

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Fokker Dr.I
#WW12002

1/72 Display Model, Oberleutnant Lothar von Richthofen

First flying in 1917, the Fokker Dr. I was an exceptionally maneuverable triplane fighter that saw widespread service with the Luftstreitkräfte in the Spring of 1918. 

This 1/72 scale, resin display model of the famous Fokker Dr. I flown by 40-victory ace Lothar von Richthofen, is better remembered as the younger brother of "The Red Baron," has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the wing struts and supports, fuselage-mounted Spandau lMG 08 machine guns, an authentic paint scheme and authentic markings, an information disc, and an articulated display stand. 4" wingspan.

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Fokker Dr.I
#WW12003

1/72 Display Model, Lt. Josef Jacobs, Jasta 7, 1918

The Fokker Dr. I, a German triplane fighter, was introduced late in the war and saw widespread service in the spring of 1918. Manfred von Richthofen the 80-victory scoring top ace of World War I better known as "The Red Baron" finished his illustrious career flying the Fokker Dr. I. Leutnant Josef Jacobs also flew the legendary warbird, a man who achieved 48 victories during the war, ranking him fourth among German aces. He is also the highest scoring pilot in the Fokker Dr. I, with more than 30 confirmed kills.

This 1/72 scale resin display model - a reproduction of Jacobs' black Fokker Dr. I - features that aircraft's signature "devil" art, textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction, wing and landing gear bracing, authentic markings, and a mid-flight, articulating display stand. Measures approximately 3¼" long with a 4" wingspan.

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Fokker D.VII
#WW11401

1/72 Display Model, Ernst Udet, Jasta 4

Introduced in May of 1918 with Jasta 10, the Fokker D.VII was a biplane fighter that served Germany through the end of the war. Because of its boxy structure, Allied pilots initially underestimated the warbird's capability; this quickly changed when they witnessed its impressive performance on the Western Front where it could dive without fear of structural damage. More than 3,000 were manufactured during the final year of the Great War, though, as part of the Armistice agreement at war's end, all models were seized by Allied nations who continued to fly the plane for many years.

This 1/72 scale resin display model — a replica of a Fokker D.VII named "Lo" flown by Ernst Udet of Jasta 4, Germany's second highest scoring ace of World War I (62 victories) behind only the Red Baron — features that aircraft's signature colorful paint scheme, finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, a pilot figure, a front propeller, fixed landing gear, authentic markings, and an articulated display stand. Measures approximately 3¾" long with a 4¾" wingspan.

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Halberstadt C.II
#WW11201

1/72 Display Model, "2204," C3MG prototype, 1918

Serving in large numbers with the German Air Service beginning in 1917, the Halberstadt CL.II was a "light" variant of the company's "C" series of fighters (hence the "CL" designation). It was well liked by pilots for its high rate of climb and excellent maneuverability and it performed escort support and ground attack roles until the end of World War I.

This 1/72 scale resin display model — a replica of a Halberstadt CL.II as it appeared with Schlasta 26b in early 1918 — features a colorful design, finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, a pilot figure, a realistic 6-cylinder inline engine, a detailed 7.92mm machine gun, fixed landing gear, authentic markings, and an articulated display stand. Measures approximately 4" long with a 6" wingspan.

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Hansa-Brandenburg W.29
#WW17001

1/72 Display Model, "2204," C3MG prototype, April, 1918

Celebrate the world's first dogfighters! Available from the Wings of the Great War series, this limited edition, newly tooled, 1/72 scale, resin display model of a Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 prototype, a large floatplane operated by the Kaiserliche Marine during World War I, is a truly unique addition to any collection! Fine features include simulated fabric-covered wings with visible ribs, a detailed Benz Bz.III engine, wing struts, accurately designed landing floats, and authentic markings. You even get an information card. Painted by hand, it has a 7¼" wingspan and includes an articulated display stand.

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LFG Roland D.VIA
#WW16001

1/72 Display Model, Oberleutnant Kissenberth, Jasta 23b, 1918

Introduced in 1918 by Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft (L.F.G.), the Roland D.VI was a single-bay biplane that featured a "Klinkerrumpf" construction where the fuselage was built of overlapping spruce strips on a wooden frame.

This limited edition, newly tooled, 1/72 scale, resin display model of a Roland D.VIa flown by 20-victory ace Oberleutnant Otto Kissenberth of Jasta 23b in 1918 has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the simulated fabric-covered wings with visible ribs to the intricate Mercedes D.III engine; wing and landing gear bracing; and authentic markings, including Kissenberth's Edelweiss flower. Includes an articulated display stand, as well as an information disc. 5¼" wingspan.

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LFG Roland D.VIA
#WW16002

1/72 Display Model, Emil Koch, Jasta 32b, 1917

Though the Roland D.VI ultimately lost a fly-off to the Fokker D.VII to determine the superior aircraft, the former was produced anyway as an insurance policy. Deliveries began in May of 1918 and by August of that year, 70 of the 350 manufactured had made it to frontline service.

The 1/72 scale resin display model — a replica of a D.VIa flown by Emil Koch of Jasta 32B in 1917 — features finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, a rotating propeller, fixed landing gear, authentic markings, and a display stand with an articulating mount to present your model at various in-flight angles! Measures approximately 3½" long with a 5¼" wingspan.

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Nieuport 17
#WW19001

1/72 Display Model, Lt. Charles Nungesser Escadrille N. 65 No. 1895

The Nieuport 17, a French biplane, was a fighter first flown in January of 1916. It was one of the most successful aircraft of World War I, featuring excellent maneuverability and an impressive rate of climb. In the end, every Allied military used the Nieuport 17 and the Germans even copied it with their Siemens-Schuckert D.I.

The 1/72 scale resin display model — a replica of a Nieuport 17 flown by Lt. Charles Nungesser, a French pilot who was the third highest-ranking French ace of World War I — features finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, a rotating propeller, fixed landing gear, authentic markings, and an articulated  display stand. Measures approximately 3¼" long with a 5" wingspan. 

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Nieuport 28C.1
#WW13002

1/72 Display Model, 2nd Lt. Quentin Roosevelt, 95th Aero Sqn., July 14, 1918

The Nieuport 28, a French biplane fighter, was the first aircraft to see operational service with an American fighter squadron. It was developed in 1917, first seeing operational service in 1918, and retired at the end of WWI. The aircraft did, however, find a post-war life in America with 50 units returning home, with a number of them featured in various Hollywood films.

The 1/72 scale resin display model of a Nieuport 28 commemorates Quentin Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt's son, killed in aerial combat on July 14, 1918. This replica has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, features authentic markings, and an articulated display stand. Measures approximately 3¼" long with a 4½" wingspan.

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Pfalz D.IIIa
#WW11002

1/72 Display Model, Jakob Pollinger, Jasta 77b, 1918

Predecessor to the Fokker D.VII, the Pfalz D.IIIa served with the Luftstreitkräfte from late 1917 through the end of World War I, but reached its peak service - with more than 400 aircraft at the front - in the spring of 1918.

This limited edition, 1/72 scale, resin display model of a Pfalz D.IIIa flown by Jakob Pollinger of Jasta 77b in 1918, has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the simulated fabric-covered wings with visible ribs to the intricate Mercedes D.IIIa engine, wing and landing gear bracing, and authentic markings, and an articulated display stand You even get an information disc. 5¼" wingspan.

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Pfalz D.IIIa
#WW11003

1/72 Display Model, Hans Müller

Though the D.III, a German fighter introduced in 1917, was considered inferior to its Albatros and Fokker counterparts, it was flown extensively by the Luftstreitkräfte until mid-1918. Add a legendary World War I-era fighter to your collection!

This limited edition, 1/72 scale, resin display model of the famous D.IIIa flown by German pilot Lt. Hans Müller-an ace credited with twelve aerial victories-features the attention to detail that collectors love, from the finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the wing struts and supports, a seated pilot figure, an authentic paint scheme and 1918 markings. Includes an articulated display stand and an information disc. 5¼" wingspan.

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Salmson 2 A2
#WW11301

1/72 Display Model, Coyle, Corley and Easterbrook, 1st Aero Sqn., 1918

The Salmson 2, first flown in 1917, was a biplane aircraft that served as the primary French reconnaissance plane during the final years of World War I. More than 3,200 were manufactured and, in addition to its service with the French, it saw extensive duty with the American Expeditionary Force.

This 1/72 scale resin display model — a replica of a Salmson operating with the 1st Aero Squadron in 1918 — features finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, a rotating propeller, fixed landing gear, authentic markings, and an articulated display stand. Measures approximately 4¾" long with a 6¾" wingspan.

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Sopwith Camel
#WW18001

1/72 Display Model, Captain Arthur Roy Brown

Though difficult to handle, the Sopwith Camel-Britain's - a single-seat biplane fighter first introduced on the Western Front in 1917 - had unmatched maneuverability for an experienced aviator.

This limited edition, 1/72 scale, resin display model of the famous Sopwith Camel flown by Capt. Arthur Brown, a Canadian ace initially credited with shooting down the "Red Baron" in his Sopwith Camel (though it was later discovered that he was fatally struck from the ground), featuring the attention to detail that collectors love, from the finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the wing struts and supports, a seated pilot figure, an authentic paint scheme and 1918 markings. Includes an articulated display stand and an information disc. 4¾" wingspan.

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Sopwith Camel
#WW18002

1/72 Display Model, Sq. Cmdr. L.S. Breadner, No. 3 Sq. RNAS, February 1918

Though difficult to handle, the Sopwith Camel-Britain's single-seat biplane fighter first introduced on the Western Front in 1917-had unmatched maneuverability for an experienced aviator. Add a legendary World War I-era fighter to your collection!

This 1/72 scale resin display model — a replica of Breadner's Sopwith Camel — features finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, a rotating propeller, fixed landing gear, authentic markings, and a display stand with an articulating mount to present your model at various in-flight angles! Measures approximately 3¼" long with a 4¾" wingspan.

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Spad XIII
#WW15001

1/72 Display Model, "4523," 94th Aero Squadron, USAS, E.V. Rickenbacker, 1918

The SPAD XIII, a French biplane aircraft of World War I, was one of the most capable fighters of the era, and one of the most-produced, with 8,472 built.

This limited edition, newly tooled, 1/72 scale, resin display model of a SPAD XIII flown by 26-victory ace Captain E.V. Rickenbacker of the 94th Aero Squadron - the first American squadron to see aerial combat during WWI - in 1918 has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the simulated fabric-covered wings with visible ribs to the 7.7mm Vickers machine guns mounted in front of the cockpit; intricate Hispano-Suiza V8 engine; wing and landing gear bracing; authentic markings, including the 94th's "Hat in the Ring" insignia, and an articulated display stand and an information disc. 4½" wingspan.

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Spad XIII
#WW15002

1/72 Display Model, 2nd Lt. Frank Luke, 27th Aero Sqn., 1918

The Spad XIII, a French biplane fighter first flown in 1917, was one of the most successful aircraft of WWI. Over 8,400 were manufactured to meet the needs of the nearly 20 nation-demand, with another 10,000 canceled following the Armistice.

This 1/72 scale resin display model of a SPAD XIII flown by 18-victory Ace Frank Luke Jr. of the 27th Aero Sqn - the first airman to receive the Medal of Honor - has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the simulated fabric-covered wings with visible ribs to the 7.7mm Vickers machine guns mounted in front of the cockpit, intricate Hispano-Suiza V8 engine, wing and landing gear bracing, authentic markings, and an articulated display stand. Measures approximately 3½" long with a 4½" wingspan.

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Spad XIII
#WW15003

1/72 Display Model, Lt. Armand de Turenne, N48/N12, 1918

The Spad XIII - a French biplane fighter - was first introduced in April of 1917. It was considered one of the most capable fighters of World War I, and also one of the most numerous: 8,472 were manufactured with another 10,000 canceled upon armistice. It was used extensively by the French and Americans during the war, though it also saw service with Soviets and others.

The 1/72 scale resin display model — a replica of a Spad XIII operated by Lt. Armand de Turenne of the N48/N18, in 1918 — features finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, a rotating propeller, fixed landing gear, authentic markings, and an articulated display stand. Measures approximately 3½" long with a 4½" wingspan.

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1:72 SCALE ARMOR COLLECTION
Sturmpanzerwagen A7V
#WW10002

1/72 Tank Model w/ Display Base

The stocky, German-built A7V tank was manufactured in response to the inaugural British tanks first appearing on the Western Front in 1916. Designs for the A7V began that year, though it did not see combat until March of 1918. It was the only German tank to see operational service during the Great War and only twenty units were produced.

This 1/72 scale resin replica of the A7V one of the very first models in our brand new Wings of the Great War: Armor Collection features textured surfaces, accurate weaponry, realistic tracks, authentic German Army markings from the Western Front in 1918, and a removable display stand. Measures approximately 4¼" long.

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British Mark IV Tank "Male"
#WW10003

1/72 Tank Model

The Mark IV tank first seeing combat duty in 1917 was the most popular British tank of World War I with more than 1,200 units being produced. It benefited greatly from its Mark variant predecessors (some of the first tanks ever manufactured), and was a clear improvement in armor, fuel-tank placement, and overall ease of transport.

This 1/72 scale resin replica of the Mark IV — one of the very first models in our brand new Wings of the Great War: Armor Collection features textured surfaces, accurate weaponry, realistic tracks, authentic British Army markings from the Western Front in 1917, and a removable display stand. Measures approximately 4" long.

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British Mark IV "Male" Tank
#WW10206

1/72 Tank Model

The Mark IV tank first seeing combat duty in 1917 was the most popular British tank of World War I with more than 1,200 units being produced. It benefited greatly from its Mark-variant predecessors (some of the first tanks ever manufactured), and was a clear improvement in armor, fuel-tank placement, and overall ease of transport.

This 1/72 scale resin model an exciting addition to our Wings of the Great War: Armor Collection is a replica of a "Male" Mark IV captured by the Germans and refitted with their markings and featuring textured surfaces, accurate weaponry, realistic tracks, authentic German markings, and a removable display stand. Measures approximately 4" long.

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RETIRED 1:72 SCALE MODELS
Albatros D.Va
#WW14001

1/72 Display Model, Jasta 46

Spurred on by the advanced technology of new Allied fighters such as the Sopwith Camel, the Germans responded with the Albatros D.V in early 1917. Unfortunately, the D.V proved heavy and sluggish, so the modified D.Va - with stronger wing spars, heavier wing ribs, a reinforced fuselage, and a high-compression engine - was introduced before the end of that year.

This limited edition, newly tooled, 1/72 scale, resin display model of an Albatros D.Va flown by Jasta 46 - and currently on display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. - has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the simulated fabric-covered wings with visible ribs to the intricate 180-hp Mercedes D.IIIaü engine, wing and landing gear bracing, magnificently re-created "Lozenge" paint scheme on the wings, and authentic markings. Includes an articulated display stand and an information disc. 5" wingspan.

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Nieuport 28C.1
#WW13001

1/72 Display Model, "6144," 94th Aero Squadron, USAS, Lt. James Meissner, 1918

Introduced in March 1918, the French-built, Nieuport 28C.1 biplane fighter was a lightweight and highly maneuverable aircraft that, after a shortage of the popular SPAD XIII, went into increased production and became the first fighter to see service with the American Expeditionary Forces' pursuit squadrons.

This limited edition, newly tooled, 1/72 scale, resin display model of a Nieuport 28C.1 flown by 8-victory ace 1st Lt. James Meissner (who also earned two Distinguished Service Crosses) of the 94th "Hat in the Ring" Aero Squadron has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the finely textured surfaces that simulate fabric-on-frame construction to the biplane struts and cross supports, authentic markings, an articulated display stand, and an information disc. 4½" wingspan.

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Pfalz D.IIIa
#WW11001

1/72 Display Model, JG II, Jasta 15, Hauptmann Rudolf Berthold, 1918

Predecessor to the Fokker D.VII, the Pfalz D.IIIa served with the Luftstreitkräfte from late 1917 through the end of World War I, but reached its peak service - with more than 400 aircraft at the front - in the spring of 1918.

This limited edition, newly tooled, 1/72 scale, resin display model of a Pfalz D.IIIa flown by 44-victory ace Hauptmann Rudolf Berthold of Jasta 15, JG 2, in 1918, has the attention to detail that collectors love, from the simulated fabric-covered wings with visible ribs to the intricate Mercedes D.IIIa engine, wing and landing gear bracing, authentic markings, articulated display stand, and an information disc. 5¼" wingspan.

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